How to Compose an Effective Post-Interview Thank You Note

How to Compose an Effective Post-Interview Thank You Note

With Thanksgiving right around the corner it seems like the perfect time to touch on Post-Interview Thank You notes again. Now we all know the importance of writing your interviewer a nice note, but if you have ever sat down after an interview and thought…”what do I write?” , here are some tips to get you started.

  1. Timing

Timing is of the essence. In today’s competitive interview world, waiting more than 24 hours to send a thank you note is far too long. Your competition is sending one right away and rising to the top of the list. While a hand-written note is nice, the speed of email will keep you front of mind.

  1. “Thank you for your time”

Here is a quick and easy way to get started:

Dear Hiring Manager,

Thank you for taking the time to meet with me today about the position on your team.

  1. Personalization

You may have met 5 people, maybe even all 5 at once; however it is essential to personalize each letter.  Simply copying and pasting, or writing 1 addressed to the whole group will make you appear lazy. Pull in details from your conversation with each individual to highlight what they said that made you even more interested.

I enjoyed speaking with you about (insert particular subject of your conversation here)

  1. Address any mistakes

Still harping on that one technical question you missed? Do not worry! There is still time to fix it and now is your time to address it. For example:

“I have continued thinking further about your question on _________ .  I wish I had mentioned (insert better answer here)

  1. Sell yourself

If you think you are the right candidate for the job, tell them!

I am confident with my experience in __________ that I would be a great fit!

  1. Close it out and ask for feedback

Please do not hesitate to contact me if I can provide any additional information. I look forward to hearing from you soon.

  1. Proof Read!

Do not forget to proof read your note and even ask a friend, family member, or your recruiter for feedback. A mistake here could cost you!

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